Domain D: Engagement, influence and impact

The knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage with, influence and impact on the academic, social, cultural and economic context.

Communication and dissemination

Aims and outcomes

This course will enable you to communicate your research through writing a blog.

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

  • make use of blogging to share your research;
  • write engaging content;
  • manage readership and analytics.

Summary

In recent years, blogging has moved beyond electronic journal writing. It is now one of the most accessible and cost-effective platforms used by organisations, teams and individuals to communicate, educate and encourage collaboration.

Blogging about your research will empower you with the ability to generate impact from your work, answer questions and share your expertise with other academics and the general public.

Course date

DateTimeDelivery method
9 March 202110:30-12:00Via Zoom

Whether you are preparing for a talk, presentation, interview or media appearance, good communication skills are vital in convincing others of the impact of your work. Through a range of tips, techniques, and practical exercises, this course will help you to communicate your ideas simply and engagingly. You will learn how best to prepare content for talks, to explain complex ideas, and to use your voice and body to get your message across most effectively. By the end of the course, you will feel more confident and better prepared for any situation in which you might be asked to explain what you do, why you do it, and the impact it has.

The course will include:

  • Warming up - How to prepare your body and your voice to present.
  • Communication without words - How to use body language to communicate most effectively about your work.
  • Telling stories - What you can learn from traditional story-telling about how to communicate engagingly about your research.
  • Working with the media - How to make the most of an opportunity to work with the media.
  • Being interviewed - How to prepare for an interview.
  • Interview practice and feedback - An opportunity to practice being interviewed. Can you explain what you do, why you do it, and the impact of your work, in a few simple sentences?
  • ‘Talking the talk’ - How to create new content for talks and presentations.
  • Dealing with nerves.

Course date

DateTimeDelivery method
24 May 202110:30-14:00Via Zoom
12 July 202110:30-14:00Via Zoom

This intensive course presents effective strategies for writing up research for publication.  Participants will follow a detailed 10-step method that enables them to start work on a well-structured and carefully targeted paper/article. The course aims to give participants the confidence to produce high quality documents that do justice to their work and stand a good chance of getting published.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • are about to write a paper for the first time
  • have written papers before, but want to have a more efficient approach
  • would like to increase their acceptance rate in their target journal, and/or
  • need to reduce the time they spend mentoring junior authors.

Content

This session will cover: a ten-step process that can help you write with greater speed and confidence, at the same time as increasing your chance of getting published in your target journal:

  1. Analyse the structure of papers, revealing aspects of editorial thinking.
  2. Create a blank ‘map’, scoping the scale of the writing task and presenting it as a Step-Tree flow chart, or list of bullet points.
  3. Determine the ‘message’ of the research, creating a clear focus of the document.
  4. Agree authorship is more about team discipline and diplomacy than rules.
  5. Research paragraph use in Introductions (and other areas), revealing the narrative structures found in academic papers.
  6. Select information by combining ‘message’ and ‘structure’, creating a tool that lets you pull what is needed at the same time as showing what information can legitimately be left out.
  7. Decide on the order of information in your first draft, listing it on a post-it.
  8. Write purposefully, using the post-it note list to guide the first draft.
  9. Revise for clarity, ensuring that the core message/claim is clearly understood by the key decision-makers.
  10. Build an abstract, recognising that this is all that many people will ever read.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will:

  • gain a greater understanding of the process of publication in academic journals
  • weigh up factors that influence your choice of journal
  • use that knowledge to develop a reader-led model of writing,
  • create a journal-appropriate structure for each paper you write before you write it
  • consider rules about who can be a co-author
  • write a clear message that sums up your findings/ideas
  • know how to put the right information in the right place in the first draft
  • begin to generate a clear and well organised master draft, and
  • consider efficient ways of working with colleagues, peer reviewers and editors through the editing stage.

Course dates

DateTimeDelivery method
25 November 20209:00-12:30Via Zoom
15 April 20219:00-12:30Via Zoom

Introduction to finding and using citations and bibliometric data

Citations and related bibliometric data will be included in REF for a number of subject areas and are widely used to compare research performance. This is an introductory session covering: what is bibliometric data and what is it used for; how to find and evaluate it; and techniques and resources to track your own citations. We will also look at the role of ORCID and Scopus author profiles in managing your publications identity. Participants will be given a workbook with examples and databases to explore.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to researchers or professional services staff who:

  • want to understand how citation data are being used in research assessment
  • want to understand some of the applications and limitations of citation data
  • are finding citation data for their own publications
  • want to check and amend their Scopus ID and/or set up an ORCID ID
  • are looking for journal impact factors and other journal impact measures.

Content

Presentation – an overview of citation data, its uses and where to find it. Workbook: to provide hands-on practice using Scopus and Web of Science to retrieve citation data, with individual help where required.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • describe some of the uses and limitations of citation data for research assessment
  • find citation data for individual publications
  • find journal impact factors and other journal impact measures
  • find and amend (if necessary) their Scopus publications profile
  • register for an ORCID ID.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

Basics of SciVal, giving access to research publications metrics for 8,500 research institutions and 220 nations worldwide.

This introductory session to the SciVal database shows you how to track research publications performance, identify institutional strengths and compare Cardiff University to peers around the world. You can analyse citations by team, department or institution, compare outputs with other institutions and analyse collaboration data. SciVal draws citation data from Scopus to provide up to 15 different metrics for any grouping of authors or publications. The data can be filtered by more than 330 journal subject categories. You can also analyse publication sets you have created, for example from a search in Scopus.

For further details on SciVal, see https://www.elsevier.com/en-gb/solutions/scival

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to academic or professional services staff who:

  • are analysing research performance metrics for groups of researchers, schools or the university
  • are benchmarking research performance metrics against other institutions
  • want to explore collaborations data for publications
  • want to track research publication metrics over time using standardised indicators.

Content

Presentation: an overview of the SciVal database and discussion of some of the metrics used. Workbook: to provide hands-on practice using SciVal with individual help where required.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • describe the features of the SciVal database
  • recognise and understand the uses for some of the key metrics used by SciVal
  • view and export data from SciVal for research analysis
  • view and export collaborations data.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

Following on from the SciVal introduction, this session shows you how to retrieve research publications metrics tailored to your research group.

Creating a Research Group in SciVal enables you to retrieve data, such as number of publications, citations per publication, highly cited publications and publications in the top ranked journals, for a specific list of authors. The session will cover: importing author IDs into SciVal; creating a research group; adding tags; retrieving data for your research group and editing your research group.

For further details on SciVal, see https://www.elsevier.com/en-gb/solutions/scival

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

Engagement and impact

Do you want to find out more about demystifying your work and disseminating your research to a wider audience? If so this session could be for you. Developing good engagement skills can result in an improved research profile, greater personal visibility and enhanced career prospects. This two-part workshop on consecutive days will help you explain your research in simple terms and connect it to the things people care about. You will discover how to pull out the key messages of what you do and consider how these messages can then be communicated using both traditional and social media.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • want to promote their work to a less specialist audience, in person and through various media
  • want to communicate with external stakeholders such as policymakers and politicians, potential research participants, users, school students and general public audiences.

Content

Course content includes:

  • understanding your audience and why it is important to communicate with them
  • potential barriers to communication
  • how to identify key audiences and appropriate communication channels
  • how to communicate your research in language that is accessible without dumbing it down
  • how to work effectively with the media
  • an introduction to some creative tools to help you engage online.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • use communication tools to contribute to the public understanding of, and engagement with research
  • understand the importance of identifying key and differing audiences and how that affects your message
  • understand the processes of using traditional and social media to spread your message beyond the experts.

Course dates

DateTimeDelivery method
10 December 2020 (Part 1)
11 December 2020 (Part 2)
10:00-12:00
10:00-12:00
Via Zoom

Length

4-hour online course, divided across 2 days, each with a 2-hour session.

The international nature of academic careers is such that your professional recognition and visibility need to reach far beyond the UK. This workshop is designed to help early stage researchers understand what an international reputation could mean for them, and recognise how to identify and connect with the broadest possible research community.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those:

  • academic and research staff with limited international experience
  • academic and research staff who wish to further develop substantial collaborations with peers and colleagues outside the UK
  • academic and research staff who wish to further develop an international network.

Content

This highly pragmatic and interactive session will explore:

  • strategies for identifying potential collaborators from within and outside your current network
  • effective behaviours to establish successful relationships with the aim of making effective research partnerships
  • the potential risks and opportunities of international collaborations - thinking about cultural and system differences
  • the requirements for tailoring project management processes for international partnerships.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that participants will be able to:

  • understand the principles of an academic reputation both within and outside the UK
  • understand the requirements for developing and International Network
  • explore how to initiate and maintain an international network
  • identify how to use an international network to establish significant international partnerships.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

Engaging with the Media is designed to give you a practical introduction to dealing with journalists with the aim of promoting your work.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • have research – or other – activities that they wish to promote through the media.

Content

This workshop will look at how to prepare for broadcast interviews and how best to get your points across to a general audience. During the session you will also come to understand some of the journalistic processes involved, which in turn should also improve your performance.

There will be verbal feedback during the course of the session and key areas for further individual improvement will be highlighted. There will be an optional opportunity for each participant to take part in a mock broadcast interview based on their area of research.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • understand better how journalists operate and what they want
  • be able to undertake media interviews around their research areas
  • be able to anticipate the common questions that journalists ask.

Course dates

DateTimeDelivery method
28 April 20219:30-13:00Via Zoom
16 June 20219:30-13:00Via Zoom

Teaching and learning

This session will focus on the ways in which teachers can use methods of evaluation to develop and enhance their teaching practice. The use of student feedback and methods of peer review, observation and dialogue will be discussed. Participants will consider their own use of reflection in reviewing their teaching and compare the usefulness of different forms of teaching evaluation in enhancing their teaching skills.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to:

  • new teachers who are wishing to develop their teaching skills and practices
  • experienced colleagues who are keen to consider the impact of their teaching on learners and learning
  • those planning a piece of pedagogic research who wish to gather data on the impact of their interventions
  • those wishing to apply for teaching recognition or undertake teaching qualifications and wish to provide evidence of the quality and impact of their teaching.

Content

The many purposes of evaluation will be outlined and the underpinning theoretical models quickly presented before collating the many ways in which teaching and the resulting learning can be captured through evaluation methods. Both informal and formal measured will be considered and critiqued. Gathering student feedback and capturing the ‘student voice’ will also be included here. Then two methods of evaluation will be addressed in details. First the way we can capture and analyse our own experiences through reflective writing. The ways in which such pieces of writing can also be used to evidence practice will be considered. Secondly the productive use of Peer Review will be discussed and plans for future continuing professional development will be made. Finally the need to ‘close the feedback loop’ will be highlighted and ways to achieve this will be shared.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • identify the many purposes of Teaching Evaluation and clarify who can evaluate teaching and learning
  • assess a range of evaluation methods, techniques and tools
  • practise the ‘art’ of reflective writing and consider how one can evidence practice and personal development in this way
  • critique the process of Peer Review and consider how to maximise its potential in personal continuing professional development
  • discuss ways in which the Feedback Loop can be closed and the impacts of evaluations be shared and disseminated.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

The Higher Education Academy runs a scheme through which everyone who teaches and/or supports learning can apply for professional recognition against the ‘UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education’ (UKPSF). The three-day ‘Getting started in Teaching’ is an opportunity for you to think about your teaching/learning support practice in ways that will enable you to write an individual application to the HEA for Associate Fellow recognition if you have an active teaching role. The ‘Getting Started in Teaching’ workshop facilitators will highlight how their sessions might help you think about the UKPSF in practically relevant ways.

Audience

This course is also suitable for staff with a limited amount of teaching experience who wish to prepare for further teaching opportunities.

Content

The course is made up of the three constituent parts:

  • improving the quality of student learning
  • lecturing skills
  • small group teaching.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmed
To be confirmedTo be confirmed

This one-day workshop will introduce you to the principles and practice of effective lecturing and how to engage students in lecturing scenarios.

Audience

This course is aimed at staff who:

  • have not lectured before but is faced with running lectures in the near future
  • want to improve their lecturing practice.

Content

This course will look at:

  • what engages students
  • how to plan a lecture
  • dealing with problems during the lecture
  • what active learning is and how to achieve it in a lecture situation
  • how to get students involved and answering your questions
  • how to handle difficult questions
  • how to relax and enjoy it.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • plan a lecture that promotes learning
  • diagnose problems with lectures
  • engage students in active learning during a lecture
  • ask brilliant questions that engage students
  • develop the students ability to critically think.

UKPSF Dimensions that are typically explored in this course:

  • A1 - design and plan learning activities and/or programmes of study.
  • A2 - teach and/or support learning.
  • A3 - give feedback to learners and formative assessment.
  • A4 - develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance.
  • K1 - subject material.
  • K2 - appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme.
  • K3 - how students learn, both generally and within their subject/disciplinary area(s).
  • K4 - the use and value of appropriate learning technologies.
  • V1 - respect individual learners and diverse learning communities.
  • V2 - promote participation in higher education and equality of opportunity for learners.
  • V4 - acknowledge the wider context in which higher education operates recognising the implications for professional practice.

Course dates

DateTimeDelivery method
7 December 2020 (Part 1)
9 December 2020 (Part 2)
9:30-12:30
9:30-12:30
Via Zoom
20 January 2021 (Part 1)
21 January 2021 (Part 2)
9:30-12:30
9:30-12:30
Via Zoom
9 March 2021 (Part 1)
10 March 2021 (Part 2)
13:30-16:30
13:30-16:30
Via Zoom
19 May 2021 (Part 1)
20 May 2021 (Part 2)
13:30-16:30
13:30-16:30
Via Zoom
7 June 2021 (Part 1)
8 June 2021 (Part 2)
9:30-12:30
9:30-12:30
Via Zoom

Length

6-hour online course, divided across 2 days, each with a 3-hour session.

This one-day workshop will introduce you to the principles and practice of effective small group teaching and how to engage students in small group scenarios. Participants should have either attended the Cardiff University Lecturing Skills course or have prior knowledge of learning theory and approaches to learning.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • have not taught in a small group before but are faced with running interactive groups in the future
  • want to improve their small group teaching practice
  • have either attended the Cardiff University Lecturing Skills course or have prior knowledge of learning theory and approaches to learning as a background to this course.

Content

During the day we look at:

  • what engages students
  • what’s the point of a small group session
  • how to plan a small group session
  • dealing with problems during the session
  • assessing learning during the session
  • what active learning is and how to achieve it in a small group situation
  • how to get students involved and answering your questions
  • how to handle difficult questions
  • how to relax and enjoy it!

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • plan a small group session that promotes learning
  • diagnose problems with small group sessions
  • engage students in active learning during a small group session
  • ask brilliant questions that engage students
  • develop the students ability to think critically.

UKPSF Dimensions that are typically explored in this course:

  • A1. Design and plan learning activities and/or programmes of study.
  • A2. Teach and/or support learning.
  • A3. Give feedback to learners and formative assessment.
  • A4. Develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance.
  • K1. Subject material.
  • K2. Appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme.
  • K3 How students learn, both generally and within their subject/disciplinary area(s).
  • K4. The use and value of appropriate learning technologies.
  • V1. Respect individual learners and diverse learning communities.
  • V2. Promote participation in higher education and equality of opportunity for learners.
  • V4. Acknowledge the wider context in which higher education operates recognising the implications for professional practice.

Course date

DateTimeDelivery method
13 April 2021 (Part 1)
14 April 2021 (Part 2)
9:30-12:30
9:30-12:30
Via Zoom

Length

6-hour online course, divided across 2 days, each with a 3-hour session.

If you are currently teaching, or thinking of gaining experience of teaching, you may be able to attain professional recognition for your work by applying for Associate Fellow status of the Higher Education Academy.

Session 1

This session will explain the benefits of attaining HEA accreditation, help you to understand the criteria for applying, consider whether your teaching fits these criteria, and introduce you to the application process. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions and clarify any issues with the course leader.

Session 2

This session builds on the webinar from session 1. Here we offer you a 30-minute individual consultation with the course leader to discuss and receive feedback on a plan for your HEA Associate Fellowship application.

The session will comprise an online (audio/video) discussion with the course leader in which you will share and receive feedback on an outline of your HEA Associate Fellowship application. (Please note, you will need to prepare a draft outline of your application in note form prior to the session, but you will not need to provide it to the course leader in advance.) Following this session, you will be in a position to produce a first full draft of your application, which will be reviewed in Session 3.

Session 3

This event builds on the first two ‘Teaching for Researchers’ sessions. Here we offer you 1-hour of the course leader’s time to receive detailed feedback on a full draft of your HEA Associate Fellowship application.

This session can take two forms. Either:

  1. You can choose to use the 1-hour slot for an online (audio/video) discussion with the course leader, in which you will receive detailed verbal feedback on your application, OR:
  2. You can request that the module leader uses the 1-hour slot to provide detailed written feedback on your application.

Please note: You will need to provide the course leader with a full written draft of your AFHEA application no later than two weeks prior to the date of your consultation. This applies whether you choose the online discussion or the written feedback option – i.e. both (1) and (2), above.

Course dates

DateTimeDelivery method
Session 1 - 9 December 202013:00 - 15:00Via Zoom
Session 2 - 8 and 10 February 2021By appointmentVia Zoom
Session 3 - 19 and 23 April 2021By appointmentVia Zoom

Length

Only Session 1 will be available to book on CoreHR, when your request has been authorised by your line manager you will then be automatically be allocated slots on Session 2 and 3. When signing up for this workshop you will be expected to attend all three sessions to complete the training.

This half-day workshop will consider issues of course design. Participants will be coached in writing clear aims and learning outcomes, selecting appropriate teaching and learning methods and effectively aligning assessment methods and criteria. The workshop will be practical and discursive in order to enable participants to tailor the given advice to their own teaching context.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to:

  • those new to teaching who wish to know more about the fundamentals of modern module design
  • those who are wishing to design a new module
  • those wishing to review an existing module.

Content

The workshop begins with an analysis of the purposes of learning outcomes and the model of constructive alignment. Attendees will then be guided in the core principles of writing clear Learning Outcome statement before critiquing and writing their own Learning Outcomes. In small groups participants will then be invited to undertake a piece of design work – planning a teaching session to meet a given Learning Outcome. The Final task will address the selection of assessment methods that align with given Learning Outcomes.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • consider the purposes of Learning Outcomes and the role they play in Module Design
  • clarify the important features of a well-constructed and written Learning Outcome statement
  • practise reviewing and writing Learning Outcomes
  • align Learning Outcomes with teaching and learning approaches and assessment methods

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed

Working with others

Successful leaders focus on getting the best out of themselves and setting stretching goals as a step towards getting the best from others. The research environment demands leaders with personal and academic independence and the resilience and strategic vision to both cope with and drive change.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • current members of Academic Staff on Research only contracts
  • those interested in knowing more about the basics of leadership and reviewing and developing their own leadership practice.

Content

This two-day course (including 1 and a half days of contact time and approximately 2 hours solo preparation) will provide researchers with an opportunity to explore what it means to be a research leader at Cardiff University, their own leadership style and approach, as well as key leadership skills and practices.

The workshop will include interactive exercises, advice on and signposting to resources, and focused discussions with a successful and experienced leader from the Cardiff University research community.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • define their personal understanding of leadership in both University and wider contexts
  • develop strategies for leading others in a range of situations
  • be more confidence when leading
  • recognise a range of support resources.

Course dates

You must attend both days to complete the programme.

DateTime Delivery method
Day 1 - 7 December 2020
Day 2 - 8 December 2020
9:30-16:30
9:30-12:30
Via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra
Day 1 - 10 June 2021
Day 2 - 11 June 2021
9:30-16:30
9:30-12:30
Via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra