Domain D: Engagement, influence and impact

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

The knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage with, influence and impact on the academic, social, cultural and economic context.

Communication and dissemination

This intensive course presents effective strategies for writing up research for publication.  Participants will follow a detailed seven-step method that enables them to start work on a well-structured and carefully targeted paper/article. The course aims to give participants the confidence to produce high quality documents that do justice to their work and stand a good chance of getting published.

Learning outcomes

  • Have a greater understanding of the process of publication.
  • Be able to employ a reader-led model of writing.
  • Weigh up the factors which influence your choice of journal.
  • Be able to generate a journal-appropriate structure for each paper/article you write.
  • Have clear guidance on how to write a message that sums up your findings.
  • Know where to find guidelines and rules about who can be a co-author.
  • Know how to put the right information in the right place in the first draft.
  • See how to create a clear and well organised master draft.
  • Have examined existing papers/articles to look for text-based issues that will help you revise your draft with confidence.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
10 January 201709:30-16:30Room 1.19, John Percival Building
9 May 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

How do you get your work published in a well-recognised journal? What is involved, and why is it important? This session is aimed at anyone new (or relatively new) to research-based writing for publication in the social sciences.

The main focus is on getting social science work published in refereed journals (though we will also consider how such writing differs from that aimed at other audiences and will touch upon other, non-written ways of communicating research outcomes which participants may wish to follow up).

We will look at:

  • journal policy and choosing journal to write for
  • how editors operate
  • the theory and practice of peer review
  • how to respond to the journal’s verdict.

The emphasis throughout is on the practical steps that can be taken at each stage in the process. The workshop includes presentation, activity, a step-by-step guide, discussion and some critique of provided examples.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
12 January 201714:00-16:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building
19 July 201714:00-16:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

There are likely to be various opportunities for you to organise academic events during your PhD. These may be subject specific seminars within your School or regional conferences for subject organisations. Alternatively, you may want to get together with students from other Schools to organise a cross-disciplinary event under a particular theme.

Whatever the type of event, getting involved will help you to develop useful transferable skills (project and time management, committee experience, etc) that can be used in a wide variety of future career paths.

This workshop will explain the practicalities of event organisation, including:

  • setting up a steering committee
  • applying for funding/budgeting
  • determining the type and focus of an event
  • identifying suitable venues (internal or external)
  • catering, publicity and tips for general administration.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
22 November 201610:00-13:00Room 1.05, Hadyn Ellis Building
26 January 201710:00-13:00Room 1.05, Hadyn Ellis Building

Would you like to know the secret to high output, low stress scholarly writing?

In academia it is often assumed that writing comes naturally. However, an overwhelming body of research shows that there are very clear and practical strategies that can greatly increase your writing productivity.

This workshop will help you to understand:

  • why it’s hard to get started
  • how we deliberately use distractions to slow down writing
  • the principles of quick starting
  • how to deal with destructive internal beliefs
  • how to set a writing plan and stick to it
  • how to set achievable goals by writing in a silo
  • how to greatly increase the number of actual words you produce
  • how to clarify your thinking and improve the quality of your work.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
9 November 201614:00-17:00Large Shandon Lecture Theatre, School of Chemistry, Main Building

This introductory session to the SciVal database shows you how to track research publications performance, identify institutional strengths and compare Cardiff University to peers around the world. You can analyse citations by team, department or institution, compare outputs with other institutions and analyse collaboration data. SciVal draws citation data from Scopus to provide up to 15 different metrics for any grouping of people or publications. The data can be filtered by more than 330 journal categories. You can also analyse publication sets you have created, for example from a search in Scopus.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to academic or professional services staff who:

  • are analysing research performance metrics for groups of researchers, Schools or the University
  • are benchmarking research performance metrics against other institutions
  • want to explore collaborations data for publications
  • want to track research publication metrics over time using standardised indicators.

Content

Presentation: an overview of the SciVal database and discussion of some of the metrics used. Workbook: to provide hands-on practice using SciVal with individual help where required.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • describe the features of the SciVal database
  • recognise and understand the uses for some of the key metrics used by SciVal
  • view and export data from SciVal for research analysis
  • view and export collaborations data.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
27 April 201714:00-15:30Training Room 2, Julian Hodge Building

Citations and related bibliometric data are now a part of REF for a number of subject areas and are included in a range of measures that are widely used to compare research performance. This presentation is an introductory session covering: what is bibliometric data and what is it used for; how to find and evaluate it; & techniques and resources to track your own citations.

We will look at managing your research identity, in particular the role of ORCID and Scopus author profiles. Participants will also be given a workbook with examples and databases to explore after the session.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to researchers or professional services staff who:

  • want to understand how citation data are being used in research assessment
  • want to understand some of the applications and limitations of citation data
  • are finding citation data for their own publications
  • want to check and amend their Scopus ID and/or set up an ORCID ID
  • are looking for journal impact factors and other journal impact measures.

Content

Presentation – an overview of citation data, its uses and where to find it. Workbook: to provide hands-on practice using Scopus and Web of Science to retrieve citation data, with individual help where required.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • describe some of the uses and limitations of citation data for research assessment
  • find citation data for individual publications
  • find journal impact factors and other journal impact measures
  • find and amend (if necessary) their Scopus publications profile
  • register for an ORCID ID.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
26 April 201714:00-15:30Training Room 2, Julian Hodge Building

You are now required to publish your research outputs in an Open Access format if you have an RCUK, Wellcome Trust, charity or Horizon 2020 Grant, Fellowship or PhD studentship.

HEFCE also mandates Open Access for journal articles and conference proceedings submitted to the next Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Audience

  • Are actively publishing or intending to publish in the near future.
  • Are active research staff or postgraduate research students.

Content

This session will introduce you to the main details you need to know about open access publishing, including how to be compliant with funder and REF policies, the different ways of publishing (Gold and Green routes), how to find out your publishers’ policies and costs, and financial support available at Cardiff. The course is run by Sonja Haerkoenen, Scholarly Publications Manager, based in the University Library Service (ULS).

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
1 March 201713:00-14:00Room 0.85, Glamorgan Building
6 April 201711:00-12:00Lecture Theatre M0.34, MATHS Building
3 May 201713:00-14:00Seminar Room A, Main Hospital Building
1 June 201712:00-13:00001, John Percival Building
5 July 201711:00-12:00S0.85, Glamorgan Building

Engagement and impact

If you look at the top ten skills wanted by employers, these bear a remarkable resemblance to the skills of a consultant; a little investigation shows that these are almost identical to the skills of an academic researcher.

This course will show you what those skills are, it will identify:

  • why ‘consultant thinking’ can be important to you in academia
  • a simple process for consulting, and show how this is a classic problem solving device, whether for research or non-research situations
  • how to use these skills to enhance any situation where you need to either produce work for someone, or influence someone to do something for you.

We will also look briefly at consulting as a career, both within and outside the academic environment.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
6 July 201709:30-17:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

Engaging with the Media is designed to give you a practical introduction to dealing with journalists with the aim of promoting your work.

Audience

  • Have research – or other – activities that they wish to promote through the media.

Content

This workshop will look at how to prepare for broadcast interviews and how best to get your points across to a general audience. During the session you will also come to understand some of the journalistic processes involved, which in turn should also improve your performance.

There will be verbal feedback during the course of the session and key areas for further individual improvement will be highlighted. There will be an optional opportunity for each participant to take part in a mock broadcast interview based on their area of research.

Learning outcomes

  • understand better how journalists operate and what they want
  • be able to undertake media interviews around their research areas
  • be able to anticipate the common questions that journalists ask.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
13 April 201709:30-13:00Room 0.52, Bute Building

This workshop is an uncomplicated yet entertaining introduction to the ideas implicit in jargon like ‘knowledge exchange’, ‘technology commercialisation’, ‘employability’, and ‘research impact’.

The workshop will be delivered using a mixture of lecture, video examples and problem-based learning activities (including the ‘technology stock market’ - a chance to become a notional technology millionaire).

At the end of this session you will:

  • understand the simple concept that helps you decide whether an invention, technology or know-how, is of interest to the outside world
  • be aware of tools for doing market research and why it is generally done badly in technology driven projects
  • know what techniques people use for getting new products and services (and also research projects!), to market on time and on budget
  • know what to do next – business plan competitions and funding scheme.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
4 April 201709:00-17:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

Teaching and learning

Do you teach, support learning, or otherwise contribute to the student learning experience?

You can apply to the Higher Education Academy (HEA) for recognition of your teaching professionalism against the ‘UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education’ (UKPSF).

Audience

This introductory 1 day session is aimed at colleagues who have not yet gained recognition for their teaching and will focus on the Associate and Fellow HEA Descriptors.

Contents

We shall look at the elements of the Standards Framework and discuss the process involved in the application and recognition process.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the session participants should be able to decide which Descriptor is appropriate to their practice and be confident to start writing an application for recognition.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
9 June 201709:30-16:3011th Floor, McKenzie House
26 June 201709:30-16:3011th Floor, McKenzie House

Find more information about the HEA recognition process or attend one of our introductory workshops.

This session will focus on the ways in which teachers can use methods of evaluation to develop and enhance their teaching practice. The use of student feedback and methods of peer review, observation and dialogue will be discussed. Participants will consider their own use of reflection in reviewing their teaching and compare the usefulness of different forms of teaching evaluation in enhancing their teaching skills.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
20 April 201713:30-16:0011th Floor, McKenzie House

The Higher Education Academy runs a scheme through which everyone who teaches and/or supports learning can apply for professional recognition against the ‘UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education’ (UKPSF). The three-day ‘Getting started in Teaching’ is an opportunity for you to think about your teaching/learning support practice in ways that will enable you to write an individual application to the HEA for Associate Fellow recognition if you have an active teaching role. The ‘Getting Started in Teaching’ workshop facilitators will highlight how their sessions might help you think about the UKPSF in practically relevant ways.

Audience

This course is also suitable for staff with a limited amount of teaching experience who wish to prepare for further teaching opportunities.

Content

The course is made up of the three constituent parts:

  • improving the quality of student learning
  • lecturing skills
  • small group teaching.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
25 January 2017
26 January 2017
27 January 2017
09:30-16:30
11 Floor, McKenzie House
19 June 2017
20 June 2017
21 June 2017
09:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

This one-day workshop will introduce you to the principles and practice of effective lecturing and how to engage students in lecturing scenarios.

Audience

  • Anyone who has not lectured before but is faced with running lectures in the near future.
  • Anyone who wants to improve their lecturing practice.

Content

During the day, we look at:

  • what engages students
  • how to plan a lecture
  • dealing with problems during the lecture
  • what active learning is and how to achieve it in a lecture situation
  • how to get students involved and answering your questions
  • how to handle difficult questions
  • how to relax and enjoy it.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • plan a lecture that promotes learning
  • diagnose problems with lectures
  • engage students in active learning during a lecture
  • ask brilliant questions that engage students
  • develop the students ability to critically think.

UKPSF Dimensions that are typically explored in this course:

  • A1 - design and plan learning activities and/or programmes of study
  • A2 - teach and/or support learning
  • A3 - give feedback to learners and formative assessment
  • A4 - develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance.
  • K1 - subject material
  • K2 - appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme
  • K3 - how students learn, both generally and within their subject/disciplinary area(s)
  • K4 - the use and value of appropriate learning technologies
  • V1 - respect individual learners and diverse learning communities
  • V2 - promote participation in higher education and equality of opportunity for learners
  • V4 - acknowledge the wider context in which higher education operates recognising the implications for professional practice.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
22 June 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

This session gives supervisors practical strategies to deal with common problems such as:

  • supervisor/student relations
  • dealing with writer's block
  • getting your student to seek help when they are stuck
  • the student who never has enough time
  • keeping on going when the going gets tough.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
9 November 201609:30-12:30Lecture Theatre, Hadyn Ellis Building

This one-day workshop will introduce you to the principles and practice of effective small group teaching and how to engage students in small group scenarios.

Audience

  • Anyone who has not taught in a small group before but is faced with running lectures in the near future.
  • Anyone who wants to improve their small group teaching practice.

Content

During the day, we look at:

  • what engages students
  • what’s the point of a small group session
  • how to plan a small group session
  • dealing with problems during the session
  • assessing learning during the session
  • what active learning is and how to achieve it in a small group situation
  • how to get students involved and answering your questions
  • how to handle difficult questions
  • how to relax and enjoy it.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • plan a small group session that promotes learning
  • diagnose problems with small group sessions
  • engage students in active learning during a small group session
  • ask brilliant questions that engage students
  • develop the student's ability to think critically.

UKPSF Dimensions that are typically explored in this course:

  • A1 - design and plan learning activities and/or programmes of study
  • A2 - teach and/or support learning
  • A3 - give feedback to learners and formative assessment
  • A4 - develop effective learning environments and approaches to student support and guidance.
  • K1 - subject material
  • K2 - appropriate methods for teaching, learning and assessing in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme
  • K3 - how students learn, both generally and within their subject/disciplinary area(s)
  • K4 - the use and value of appropriate learning technologies
  • V1 - respect individual learners and diverse learning communities
  • V2 - promote participation in higher education and equality of opportunity for learners
  • V4 - acknowledge the wider context in which higher education operates recognising the implications for professional practice.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
27 March 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

This is the second stage of a blended learning programme which will include taught sessions, online learning and peer-supported reflection on practice, which will help you to:

  • develop awareness of the context and importance of supervision to the student, the University and the wider research environment
  • learn about approaches, skills and common issues in supervision
  • develop insight through guided reflection about your practice.

Audience

  • Are early career researchers who are beginning to supervise PhD students.
  • Are academic staff who are starting or developing their role as supervisors.
  • Are academic staff who are responsible for PhD students in doctoral cohorts/centres.

Content

There are three stages. The first (Foundation) stage is the one - hour mandatory Information Session for Research Degree Supervisors. We may ask you to confirm if you have completed this, or when you intend to do so, when you register.

The second stage is entitled Supervision Skills and Practices. It involves a group session of 3.5 hours plus 1 hour (max) online preparation.

The third stage, Practice development includes a minimum of 2 hours structured, peer-supported reflection over six months following the group session, plus options for self-directed online learning.   You will be asked to submit a short reflective summary on this stage within six months; this will mark completion of the Programme (unless the Foundation stage is outstanding). You will be asked to prepare a short exercise from the online learning resources Supervising Doctoral Studies. Further information will be provided when you register for the second stage session.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • recognise the pivotal role of Doctoral supervision in building capacity and for the wider research environment
  • identify the key stages of supervision and how to facilitate progress through the timeline to completion
  • understand how different students may approach their research and recognise how to adapt their approaches to work with different styles and methodologies
  • develop their appreciation of their own strengths and areas for further development as supervisors
  • recognise the range of support resources available to postgraduate research students.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
24 October 201609:30-13:00Room 1.05, Hadyn Ellis Building
8 June 201713:00-16:30Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

This workshop is suitable for all staff who supervise research students. It reviews the skills of supervision, considers ways of handling the student/supervisor relationship effectively, and looks at methods of helping students towards completion.

Audience

  • Early Career Researchers wanting to formalise their previous experience.
  • People with reseponsibility for day to day supervision of research students.
  • New supervisors wanting more formal structures for supervision.
  • More experienced supervisors wanting to refresh their skills, explore best practice in supervision or update their previous training.

Content

This workshop will explore the planning for and mechanics of motivating and directing a research student who is studying for a PhD or master's degree. Participants in this workshop will explore the responsibilities of both the students and their supervisor(s), the value of planning a project with measurable outcomes and the importance of monitoring the progress of their students during supervision. There will be the opportunity to discuss and to reflect on previous experiences of supervision.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • be clear on their responsibilities as a supervisor
  • know the responsibilities of a student
  • understand how to use and structure supervisory meetings
  • have clear plans for monitoring student progress
  • have a plan for preparing their student for thesis submission and the viva exam.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
5 June 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

This half day workshop will consider issues of course design. Participants will be coached in writing clear aims and learning outcomes, selecting appropriate teaching and learning methods and effectively aligning assessment methods and criteria. The workshop will be practical and discursive in order to enable participants to tailor the given advice to their own teaching context.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
20 April 201710:00-13:0011th Floor, McKenzie House

Working with others

The ability to thrive in a collaborative environment is increasingly becoming one of the most necessary skills for being truly effective in the research environment, both at the interdisciplinary university level and with external organisations.

This workshop will:

  • explore the skills that are required for effective collaboration
  • identify the barriers, and the opportunities
  • understand the pitfalls – and how to overcome them
  • examine how you can use collaboration to increase the opportunities open to you as a research professional.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
21 November 201609:30-17:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

This one-day, practically focussed programme starts by examining the different people we need to manage in our research environment and considers how we communicate with each other effectively.

Managing people requires you to find strategies and plans that suit your style and the style of those you manage. The course discusses a range of options and further recommended reading and resources will support participants to embed relevant practices in their day-to-day work and relationships.

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • currently directly manage a team of people
  • aspire to directly manage a team of people in a research environment
  • have a group of stakeholders to manage in a research project.

Outline of content

Motivating others

  • What motivates people in a research environment?
  • Different motivation strategies for the different people you manage.
  • Motivating yourself to develop your people management skills.

Delegation

  • Delegating the most appropriate thing to others.
  • Managing your own time – managing others workloads.
  • Keeping track of delegated tasks.

Reviewing progress

  • The role of planning in managing people.
  • Keeping research and researchers on track.
  • Making the most of opportunities for group meetings.

Effective one-to-one meetings

  • Creative, engaging conversations.
  • Keeping track of why you are meeting and what the outcomes are.
  • Having difficult conversations if and when you need to.

On completion of this course, it is expected that learners will be able to:

  • directly apply some techniques to their current work
  • be able to reflect on why some techniques work with some people and why others techniques are relevant for other people
  • consider how they practically learn about people management in their current and future roles.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
To be confirmedTo be confirmedTo be confirmed