Domain C: Research governance and organisation

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

The knowledge of the standards, requirements and professional conduct that are needed for the effective management of research.

Finance, funding and resources

For research staff new to research grant writing. Content will cover:

  • how research funding works in the UK
  • points to consider when selecting a funder or scheme
  • what funders look for in good bids
  • practical tips.

Audience

  • Have little or no experience of UK Research Funding.
  • Would like to know more about:
    • where to source information
    • how UK research funding works
    • the opportunities and challenges of UK research funding
    • points to consider when choosing a funding scheme.
  • Have plans to prepare a future research grant or fellowship application or indeed wish to contribute to a research grant application led by another.

Content

Overall aims of the workshop are to raise participant awareness of the UK Research Funding Environment and provide them with practical advice for preparing a competitive research bid.

Learning outcomes

  • Understand better how UK Research Funding works.
  • Source the information they need in an efficient way.
  • Recognise the funding scheme best suited to their own needs.
  • Plan better for future research bid preparation.
  • Utilise top grant-writing tips when preparing future bid.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
15 November 201609:00-12:3011th Floor, McKenzie House
15 November 201613:00-16:3011th Floor, McKenzie House
08 February 201709:00-12:3011 Floor, McKenzie House
08 February 201713:00-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House
01 June 201709:00-12:30Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building
01 June 201713:00-16:30Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

Overall aim of the workshop is to raise participant awareness of what funders look for in a good research grant application.

Audience

  • Have limited experience of grant writing or have had limited success with research proposals to date.
  • May only have written small bids or contributed to other’s grant applications.
  • May have not written a research proposal for some time and who are in need of a refresher (as such this may appeal to early or mid-career researchers).
  • Lecturers/senior lecturers and post-doctoral researchers looking to secure future research grant or fellowship funding and to whom one or more of the above apply.

Content

Interactive workshop for research and academic staff who have only a limited experience of grant writing (for example, may have contributed to other’s grant applications or written small grants). The trainer, Dr Pam Johnstone, herself once a researcher, subsequently spent over a decade managing large research portfolios in government departments and a large medical research charity where she managed peer review/decision-making processes.

Areas covered:

  • How research funders work/make decisions – process and peer review.
  • Qualities of a good research bid and a look at some of the specifics including Pathways to Impact.
  • Practical tips.
  • Brief look at the opportunities and challenges around more complex bids (collaborative, multi-disciplinary etc.)
  • Provision of information on local support/advice.

Learning outcomes

  • Overcome the most common pitfalls of grant-writing.
  • Write in a way more targeted to their audience.
  • Utilise practical tips and tools for preparing a competitive bid.
  • Address Research Council requirements for Pathways to Impact.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
06 April 201710:00-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

Overall aim of the workshop is to raise participant awareness of what funders look for in a good research grant application.

Audience

  • Have limited experience of grant writing or have had limited success with research proposals to date.
  • May only have written small bids or contributed to other’s grant applications.
  • May have not written a research proposal for some time and who are in need of a refresher (as such, this may appeal to early or mid career researchers).
  • Lecturers/senior lecturers and post-doctoral researchers looking to secure future research grant or fellowship funding and to whom one or more of the above apply.

Content

Interactive workshop for research and academic staff who have only a limited experience of grant writing (for example may have contributed to other’s grant applications or written small grants). The trainer, Dr Pam Johnstone, herself once a researcher, subsequently spent over a decade managing large research portfolios in government departments and a large medical research charity where she managed peer review/decision-making processes.

Areas covered:

  • How research funders work/make decisions – process and peer review.
  • Qualities of a good research bid and a look at some of the specifics including Pathways to Impact.
  • Practical tips.
  • Brief look at the opportunities and challenges around more complex bids (collaborative, multi-disciplinary etc.)
  • Provision of information on local support/advice.

Learning outcomes

  • Overcome the most common pitfalls of grant-writing.
  • Write in a way more targeted to their audience.
  • Utilise practical tips and tools for preparing a competitive bid.
  • Address Research Council requirements for Pathways to Impact.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
27 April 201710:00-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House
3 May 201710:00-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House

Financial awareness is a fundamental part of starting a business and is important within the research environment too. Whether you are thinking of starting your own business or just want to improve your financial knowledge and skills, this workshop will put you on track.

At the end of the day you will be able to:

  • prepare an operational cash budget using an Excel template
  • understand what profit/loss statements and balance sheets are and how they are constructed
  • understand the basics of ‘Dragons' Den finance’ (“I’ll sell you 40% of my company for £1m”)
  • tell how quickly a company pays its creditors and gets paid by its debtors
  • understand the difference between capital and revenue items
  • understand the difference between full and marginal costing
  • understand the difference between overheads and direct costs
  • fill out a VAT form
  • know the meaning of accruals, depreciation, creditors, reserves, and a whole lot of other accounting terms.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
5 April 201709:00-17:00Room 0.27b, Hadyn Ellis Building

This short day interactive event will provide research staff with information and insights into the benefits and practicalities of applying for academic fellowships as part of developing an academic career. The session will include insights into lay statements , personal career benefits  and  networking with experienced fellows from a range of disciplines, information on sources of fellowship funding and practical exercises on the key elements of applications.

Speakers include:

  • Dr Ian Humphries, session leader, holder of a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship in Basic Biomedical Science and panel member for the awarding of Fellowships by Wellcome
  • Mr Roy Norris, lay faculty
  • Mrs Josie Grindulis, Career Development manager
  • Dr Mari Nowell of Research and Enterprise Services on sources of funding
  • Dr Agatha Herman, a lecturer in Human Geography at Cardiff University and a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow, will be assisting some networking discussions
  • Dr Joe Wilkes of School of Physics and Astronomy holder of EPSRC Postdoctoral Fellowship and past recipient of EPSRC Doctoral Prize Fellowship.

This event is useful to all disciplines.

Eligibility requirements

Places on this workshop are open to staff members on a research-only contract. Other staff groups are welcome to apply for a place and will be entered onto a reserve list. In the event of a place becoming vacant a week prior to the session commencing, staff members will be offered a place. For further guidance please email researcherdevelopment@Cardiff.ac.uk

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
13 March 201709:30-15:00Committee Rooms 1 & 2, Glamorgan Building

Professional conduct

This is an introductory session for all academic staff who come in contact with children and young people in some capacity through their research role. The course covers responsibilities under child welfare legislation and Cardiff University's Safeguarding Children and Vulnerable Adults policy linked to key guidance.

It will focus on identifying signs of abuse and placing these in context of what constitutes significant harm to children and young people. The course will provide an opportunity to explore areas of potential conflict when looking at issues of neutrality, consent and confidentiality for the researcher.

Audience

  • Are undertaking research directly with children.
  • Are undertaking research with adults who are parents of dependent children.
  • Who are undertaking research with groups of adults and children.
  • Are going into family homes as a result of their research.
  • Are going into settings where there are children e.g. schools, hospitals, daycare provision.

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the key legislation and related guidance for child protection in Wales.
  • Recognise the context, signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect.
  • Apply good practice when dealing with concerns and disclosures about abuse.
  • Understand professional abuse and the importance of whistle blowing
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of professionals in other agencies working in child protection.
  • Identify and use effective record keeping, information sharing and confidentiality in relation to child protection and the referral process.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
11 May 201712:30-16:0011 Floor, McKenzie House

This workshop is relevant to researchers intending to conduct research within the NHS (i.e. with NHS patients, relatives of patients, staff, data, human tissue or on NHS premises) or those working on Clinical Trials of Investigative Medicinal Products (CTIMPs). The workshop will introduce researchers to the national regulations governing clinical research, specifically the Research Governance Framework for Health and Social Care and the Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trial) Regulations, as well as addressing some of the over-riding principles of Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The primary focus will be on explaining the internal and external processes necessary for obtaining approval for projects which involve the NHS.

Audience

The workshop is suitable for all those who manage or undertake research involving NHS patients, staff or facilities or clinical trials of a medicinal product.

Content

The workshop will focus on the principles of research governance and ethics and the practicalities of conducting research in the NHS. Participants will be provided with an introduction to:

  • the national regulations governing clinical research and CTIMPs and some of the overriding principles of Good Clinical Practice (GCP);
  • the University’s standards for research integrity and governance;
  • the necessary University and NHS processes required to conduct research in the NHS, including the procedure for applying for University Sponsorship;
  • the practicalities of applying for NHS Research Ethics Committee (REC) approval and NHS management permissions (‘R&D’ approval) in Wales and other UK countries.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the workshop participants should have an understanding of:

  • relevant clinical research regulations and laws;
  • which approvals are required for their research projects;
  • how to design research documents to meet NHS standards;
  • how to apply for University Sponsorship, NHS Research Ethics Committee (REC) and R&D management approval.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
14 February 201709:30-12:0011th Floor, McKenzie House

The course introduces the participants to intellectual property and the intellectual property rights which exist to protect them.

The course is delivered via 2 presentations.  The first presentation will look at copyright, your rights and the rights of others and includes a brief overview of copyright, ownership, exclusive and moral rights of the copyright owner as well as copying legally through permitted acts, obtaining permission and licenses.

The second presentation aims to introduce participants to the basics of intellectual property rights that may exist in the outputs of their research. It includes an introduction to copyright and the process of patenting outlining some of the routes which can be used to commercialise a technology. An overview will be provided as to how the outcomes of research are exploited within Cardiff University and the support available. Completion of the course will enable participants to identify intellectual property in their own research and determine how it can be protected.

Audience

This course should prove to be of particular interest to those who:

  • Have an interest in understanding their rights and the rights of others when using and allowing the use of third party copyright material
  • Are applying for funding with a collaborating institution where IP arrangements need to be clarified
  • Are interested in learning about intellectual property and how to protect it
  • Are interested in learning the about copyright and the process of patenting an invention
  • Are interested in commercially exploiting the outcomes of their research
  • Are applying for funding which requires knowledge of patents or intellectual property

Content

  1. Introduction to intellectual property rights: Introduction to patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks
  2. Patents: What can be patented, exclusions in patenting, defining novelty and disclosure, the differences between inventors and owners of an invention
  3. Patent process: application process, timelines and costs involved
  4. Copyright and ownership: the does and don’ts
  5. Commercial exploitation: Market research, licensing, spin-out company formation

Learning outcomes

  • Understand the basics of intellectual property rights (patents, copyright, design) and how to protect them
  • Determine whether an invention is novel and inventive
  • Learn the importance of non-disclosure, confidentiality and useful agreements to protect intellectual in put
  • Understand the process of patenting an invention
  • Understand the routes to commercialising the outcomes of research

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
28 February 201709:30-13:0011 Floor, McKenzie House

Project management

Planning for and successfully completing your research programme is a key factor in your career development as a researcher. Perhaps you find yourself effectively running the project on your Principle Investigator's grant, possibly managing their research team while aspiring to submit grants yourself or maybe you have just gained your first grant award.

This workshop doesn't teach any formal project management framework, rather it explores the appropriate skills to ensure the project runs effectively to achieve its objectives while giving you the resources to manage yourself and others more effectively during the process.

Audience

  • Early career researchers with limited experience of managing projects and no formal training in project management.
  • Active researchers who are beginning to submit their own grant applications.
  • Researchers who find they have responsibility for managing other people's research projects.
  • Researchers beginning to collaborate in multiple projects.

Content

During this workshop participants focus on three specific aspects of project management skills:

  • Managing yourself – skills in personal effectiveness and organisation.
  • Managing your project – understanding how to manage stakeholders, scope, risk and tasks etc during the project.
  • Influencing other people – particularly when you don't have line management responsibility.

This workshop will explore aspects of

  • self-management, including how to prioritise choices and  to organise our own time and resources to best achieve the project goals,
  • project management starting with preparing to write the application, managing the project and stages of project completion.
  • effective communication with colleagues, particularly when we may not have line management responsibility.

Learning outcomes

  • A better awareness of how to exert control or influence.
  • Different ways to consider prioritising tasks and projects.
  • An understanding of project management processes.
  • Additional strategies to communicate with collaborators and colleagues.

Course dates

DateTimeVenue
22 November 201609:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House
13 February 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House
22 June 201709:30-16:3011 Floor, McKenzie House